Conversation Between Two Friends In English Audio Free Download

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Two friends (Cam and Lajuan) are talking about their families and friends, and their own experiences as gay men. Audio: WAV MP3 Text: TRN CHAT. SBC045 The Classic Hooker. Face-to-face conversation recorded in the living room of an apartment in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Two friends (Corinna and Patrick) are talking and watching TV.

Where did you go for your last holiday? What did you do, and did you enjoy it? In this free English listening lesson from Oxford Online English, a woman talks about her last holiday in Italy. You can learn some useful questions, words and phrases to use when talking about vacations. This lesson is for pre-intermediate learners.

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Listen to the dialogue at normal speed here:

https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Talking-about-holidays-full.mp3

or listen to a slower version here:

https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Talking-about-holidays-25pc.mp3

Man: So, how was your trip?
Woman: Oh, it was amazing! Holiday of a lifetime.
Man: You went to Venice, right?
Woman: No! Where did you get that idea? We went to Pisa and Cinque Terre.
Man: What’s it like around there?
Woman: Oh, it’s beautiful, especially on the coast. There are some really nice towns and you can swim and sunbathe and walk in the hills if that’s your thing.
Man: Did you speak any Italian?
Woman: No, not really. They get a lot of tourists around there, so they’re used to speaking English.
Man: Bet the food was good though.
Woman: Oh, you can’t even imagine. You even eat when you’re full just because it tastes so good.
Man: Did you bring back any souvenirs? some nice wine? olive oil? an Italian boyfriend?
Woman: No, of course not! Don’t be cheeky!

Talking about Holidays – exercise 1
Vocabulary: tourism words and collocations

The dialogue features words and expressions for the experience of going on holiday and also to describe the places that tourists visit. These include collocations – common combinations of words.

For each question, mark the option that you hear in the dialogue.

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  1. 1. Question

    The ‘incorrect’ options may be correct language – but they’re not what the speakers say: your job is to identify what you hear. Sometimes the incorrect options are also incorrect language. Click ‘Hint’ for more details.

    1. Which question does the man ask?

    Hint

    Hint: All four options are correct language, though they mean slightly different things:

    – a journey is when you travel from one place to another;
    – a trip is when you leave one place, visit one or many other places, then go back to where you started (e.g. home);
    – ‘holiday’ is British and ‘vacation’ is American; they are similar to trip but with the additional idea that your reason for travel is leisure or relaxation – a trip can include work, for example.

  2. 2. Question
    Hint

    This is an example of collocation – only one answer is possible because the other three options are never used in this combination.

  3. 3. Question
    Hint

    The four options all mean something similar – the key difference is register: how formal is the language? The version used in this dialogue is the most informal, because it’s a conversation between two friends.

  4. 4. Question
    Hint

    This time it’s a question of grammar: the phrase ‘be used to’ means ‘be accustomed to’ or ‘be familiar with’ but there is a rule about the form of the verb that comes next. It’s the one used in the dialogue!

  5. 5. Question
    Hint

    The verbs ‘bring’, ‘come’, ‘go’ and ‘take’ can all be used before the word ‘back’. You can discount two of them in this case, because they don’t involve the idea of carrying something from one place to another. The difference between the other wrong option and the right answer is the direction of travel (home < - > holiday).

Talking about Holidays – exercise 2
Grammar: word order in questions

The order of words in questions is one of the most confusing things in English. There are rules to help you – it’s just a bit more complicated than it might be in your language.

Read five rules about word order in questions; for each one, move the words into the right order to make a question that is used in the dialogue.

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  1. 1. Question

    The capital letter has been removed from the first word to make this exercise more of a challenge, and so has the question mark after the last word!

    1. If you want the answer ‘yes’ or ‘no’, an easy way to form a question is to make an affirmative statement, then add ‘right?’

    The word order is: subject + verb + complement + right?
    Example: You’reGerman, right?

    Unfortunately for you, this isn’t possible in more formal situations, but it’s fine in informal contexts like this recording.

    Sort the words to form the question used in the dialogue.

    • right
    • you

    View Answers:

    Correct
    Incorrect
  2. 2. Question

    2. If the context is not informal, you must use a different word order for yes/no questions:

    auxiliary verb + subject + main verb + complement
    Example: Doyoulikesunbathing?

    The auxiliary verb depends on the tense – the example in the last sentence uses the present tense ‘do’ but the question from the dialogue is in the past simple.

    • any Italian
    • did

    View Answers:

    Correct
    Incorrect
  3. 3. Question

    3. Some questions can’t be answered with ‘yes’ or ‘no’ – they are asking for information. In most information questions, you need an auxiliary verb and the same word order as the previous example, plus a question word at the beginning:

    question word + auxiliary verb + subject + main verb (+ complement)
    Example: Wheredoyoulive?

    Now make an information question from the dialogue.

    • that idea
    • where

    View Answers:

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Hint

    Grammar Extra!
    Some information questions starting with ‘who’ or ‘what’ do not require an auxiliary verb – it depends on the grammar of the answer:
    Q: Who painted the Mona Lisa?
    A: Leonardo da Vinci painted it.
    > The ‘who’ of the question is the subject of the verb in the answer, so there’s no auxiliary verb.
    Q: What did you paint in your art class?
    A: We painted a bowl of fruit.
    > The ‘what’ of the question is the object of the verb in the answer, so you need an auxiliary verb.

  4. 4. Question

    4. You don’t need the auxiliary verb ‘do’ if the main verb is ‘be’, but you still need question word order, with the verb before the subject:

    question word + be + subject (+ complement)
    Example: Whyareyouinterested in castles?

    A complement is something that comes after the verb to tell you more about the subject – e.g. ‘you’ (the subject) are ‘interested in castles’ – but not all questions have a complement. The question from the dialogue doesn’t have one.

    • was
    • trip

    View Answers:

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Hint

    The subject is two words: possessive adjective + noun

  5. 5. Question

    5. When the main verb is ‘be’, there is often a ‘dummy’ subject in English – that is, the word ‘it’ or ‘there’ which acts as the subject in terms of grammar but doesn’t really mean anything. When this happens, a complement is needed – because ‘it’ and ‘there’ don’t carry meaning, so something has to! The word order is the same as the last example:

    question word + be + dummy subject + complement (+ adverbial)
    Example: Whyarethereso many churcheshere?

    Adverbial information is optional – it adds detail about time or place.

    Now make a ‘dummy subject’ question from the dialogue.

    • is
    • it

    View Answers:

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Hint

    There is a trap here: in some contexts, ‘like’ is a verb, but not in this case.

Talking about Holidays – exercise 3
Pronunciation: understanding stress and intonation

Stress and intonation are both ways in which the sound of what we say depends on meaning, but they’re not the same thing. Do you know the difference?

Listen to five excerpts from the recording and find the matching rule about stress and intonation.

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  1. 1. Question

    We pronounce some words more prominently than others – they are a bit longer and louder – because those words put the meaning in the sentence: this is stress.

    We say some phrases with a rise or fall in the pitch, to give a message to the speaker that is not contained in the meaning of the individual words: this is intonation.

    1. Normally, nouns, verbs (apart from ‘be’), adjectives and adverbs are stressed because they put meaning in the sentence; prepositions, articles and pronouns don’t, so they’re unstressed.

    Listen to the recording and choose which words are stressed.

    https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Talking-about-holidays-stress-its-beautiful-especially-on-the-coast.mp3
  2. 2. Question

    2. If a speaker thinks some words are even more important than the other stressed words, they can make them prominent – that is, much longer than normal.

    Which words are prominent in the recording?

    https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Talking-about-holidays-stress-tastes-so-good.mp3
  3. 3. Question

    3. We use intonation to indicate to someone else whether we have finished speaking or not. Your voice should fall and slow down at the end of a sentence, but rise if you haven’t finished yet.

    Has the speaker in this clip finished her sentence?

    https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Talking-about-holidays-intonation-there-are-some-really-nice-towns.mp3
  4. 4. Question

    4. We also use intonation in lists. When you’re writing a list you can use bullet points – and when you’re speaking, use pauses and a certain intonation.

    What do both speakers do with their voices for each item in the list?

    https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Talking-about-holidays-intonation-list-swim-and-sunbathe.mp3

    https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Talking-about-holidays-intonation-list-nice-wine.mp3
  5. 5. Question

    5. Like the grammar of word order, there’s more than one rule for intonation in questions.

    In this information question, does the speaker’s voice rise or fall at the end?

    https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Talking-about-holidays-elision-where-did-you-get-that-idea.mp3

Talking about Holidays – exercise 4
Pronunciation: elision and the glottal stop

When we put words together, some sounds change. One very common example is when the sound /t/ almost disappears – this is called elision.

Listen to five excerpts containing examples of elision and write the missing words.

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  1. 1. Question

    They all contain a ‘silent’ /t/. Click ‘Hint’ for more information about what is happening in the mouth.

    https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Talking-about-holidays-elision-we-went-to-pisa.mp3
    • 1. We to Pisa and Cinque Terre.

    Hint

    Think of the word ‘football’: nobody pronounces a full /t/ because their mouth is already moving into position for /b/.

    Some people put their tongue into place to make a /t/ but don’t make the sound; others do nothing with their tongue and block the sound by closing their vocal cords instead – this is called a glottal stop, and the female speaker in this dialogue does it a lot. It is not ‘incorrect’ or ‘lazy’ pronunciation: when the next sound is a consonant, dropping /t/ is a common feature of standard English. Even the Queen does it!

    However, the speaker in this recording uses glottal stops so much that it sometimes occurs when the next sound is a vowel. Dropping /t/ before a vowel is not standard, but it is common for speakers with certain accents, such as people from London and South-east England.

  2. 2. Question
    https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Talking-about-holidays-elision-you-cant-even-imagine.mp3
    • 2. Oh, you even imagine.

  3. 3. Question
    https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Talking-about-holidays-elision-where-did-you-get-that-idea.mp3
    • 3. Where did you idea?

  4. 4. Question
    https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Talking-about-holidays-elision-it-was-amazing.mp3
    • 4. – So how was your trip?
      – Oh, was amazing!

  5. 5. Question
    https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Talking-about-holidays-elision-no-not-really.mp3
    • 5. No, really. They a of around there, so they’re to speaking English.

    Hint

    In the last gap, the final sound is /t/ but not in the spelling!

Here, organised according to level, you will find all the listening resources on esl-lounge Premium.

If you would like some infomation about how to use these audio files, go to our 'Using The Listenings' page.

Elementary Pre-Intermediate Intermediate Advanced Business

The Charity Show

Description: Two friends talk about a talent contest.
Language: Can and Can't for ability.
Dialect: North American English Length: 2m 04s Code: 2L1
Accompanying Worksheet:The Charity Show

Diana's New Job

Description: Diana talks to her friend about her new job.
Language: Quantifiers: few, a little, much, many, etc.
Dialect: North American English Length: 1m 31s Code: 2L2
Accompanying Worksheet:Diana's New Job

The Job Interview

Description: Woman interviewed for a job by male interviewer.
Language: Past simple and present perfect to talk about experiences and events.
Dialect: North American & British English Length: 3m 52s Code: 2L3
Accompanying Worksheet:The Job Interview

Vacation Stress

Description: Leroy sends a 'talking postcard' home to his family from his European vacation.
Language: Review of past simple, present continuous and going to future.
Dialect: British English Length: 2m 10s Code: 2L4
Accompanying Worksheet:Vacation Stress

Vacation Stress

Language: List of countries and cities for word stress exercise (see Pre-Intermediate lesson plan 2L4.
Dialect: British English Length: 1m 14s Code: 2L4b
Accompanying Worksheet:Vacation Stress

The Inspector Calls

Description: Conversation between police inspector and wife of murder victim.
Language: Past simple to talk about sequence of past events.
Dialect: North American & British English Length: 3m 00s Code: 2L5
Accompanying Worksheet:The Inspector Calls

Best Friends

Description: Informal conversation in which two friends complete a friendship survey.
Language: Present simple and present perfect questions.
Dialect: North American English Length: 3m 17s Code: 2L6
Accompanying Worksheet:Best Friends

Bored Betty

Description: Informal conversation in which two friends talk about what to do together.
Language: Functional language of suggesting/inviting.
Dialect: North American & British English Length: 1m 52s Code: 2L7
Accompanying Worksheet:Bored Betty

A Matter Of Taste

Description: Conversation between two friends about modern art exhibition and specific paintings.
Language: Descriptive language, talking about modern art.
Dialect: North American & British English Length: 2m 27s Code: 2L8
Accompanying Worksheet:A Matter Of Taste

Checking In

Language: Functional language to give instructions, orders, etc.
Dialect: North American English Length: 2m 21s Code: 2L9
Accompanying Worksheet:Checking In

Old Friends

Description: Conversation between two friends about an old photograph.
Language: Past simple to talk about past events, giving basic information about people.
Dialect: North American English Length: 3m 12s Code: 2L10
Accompanying Worksheet:Old Friends

Kitchen Capers

Description: Chris needs help in the kitchen from his friend Jennifer.
Language: Imperative to give instructions and make suggestions, cooking terminology.
Dialect: North American English Length: 2m 37s Code: 2L11
Accompanying Worksheet:Kitchen Capers

Evening Classes

Description: Conversation between two friends deciding which evening class to do.
Language: Comparing and constrasting different courses; expressing preference.
Dialect: North American & British English Length: 3m 17s Code: 2L12
Accompanying Worksheet:Evening Classes

Choices Choices

Description: Conversation between two friends deciding which computer to buy.
Language: Comparing and constrasting, computer jargon, expressing preference, dislike.
Dialect: North American English Length: 2m 17s Code: 2L13
Accompanying Worksheet:Choices Choices

Conversation Between Two Friends In English Audio free. download full

Images From The Past

Language: Reminiscing, story telling, past simple.
Dialect: North American & British English Length: 3m 22s Code: 2L14
Accompanying Worksheet:Images From The Past

The Outrageous Office

Description: Conversation between two friends about a difficult work environment.
Language: Past Continuous.
Dialect: North American & British English Length: 3m 22s Code: 2L15
Accompanying Worksheet:The Outrageous Office

Possibility Of A Study

Description: Conversation between real estate agent and a couple as they view a house.
Language: Discussing positive/negative points of a property, comparative adjective forms.
Dialect: North American & British English Length: 2m 58s Code: 2L17
Accompanying Worksheet:Possibility Of A Study

Conversations Between People

Elementary Pre-Intermediate Intermediate Advanced Business